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The New New Testament

September 13, 2011

Meet Ken Maley, or as he refers to himself, “The Scribe.” Ken has written a new version of the New Testament. Wait, scratch that, Jesus and the authors of the NT, “Asked Ken to rewrite the NT the way they would want it today.”

In this New New Testament the scribe was told to restore John’s Gospel to its rightful place as the first Gospel, as reflected in ancient Aramaic Manuscripts. Thus this New Testament will begin as did the Old Testament: “In the beginning,” as a sign that it is meant to supersede much of it. Revelation was to begin again with Jesus. This change of position of John’s Gospel puts the two books of Luke—Luke’s Gospel and Acts—back together as they were initially.

Jesus is laughing at the absurdity of The Scribe's claims

We must realize that Jesus was not simply to continue the Revelation of the Old Testament, but came with a radically different Message about God, Spirituality, and Community. His God was his “Dad”—”Abba” in his native language. That one word alone transcended much of the Old Testament, but all the original Apostles were Jews formed in the Judaism of the day, which had strayed a great deal from the Covenant of Abraham. Over and over Jesus upset the Jewish leaders of the time by preaching and acting a different Message. But much of his radical intimacy with God was lost on the Jewish Apostles, the authors of the original New Testament, and its translators.

For example, some scholars have pointed out that the passage usually translated, “I have not come to change the law, but to fulfill it,” should actually be translated, “I have not come to change the law, but to abolish it.”

The translators or scribes who changed this passage could not believe what Jesus had said, so they simply changed it to fit their own beliefs.

If that’s not compelling enough for you. Check out the endorsements:

“Exactly what Jesus would say if he came to earth again! Perhaps this is how he will come again.”  –  Christian Person
“What Christians have been seeking for centuries. Literally millions will love it.”   – Catholic Bishop
“Speechless! I am totally amazed at what is here.”   – Person with ties to India and Hinduism
“Poetry for my soul.”  – Protestant Minister
“Marvelous! My wife and I have read John’s Gospel through twice to each other. Our favorite phrase: ‘God’s Heart is so big you can’t walk out of it.’”   – Couple with a Mormon background
“Many will find that this book is miraculous, since Jesus brings us into the Heart of God.”  – A Seeker

I dont’ know about you, but as Bob says, “Personally, I have always found the recommendations of “Person with ties to India and Hinduism” to be quite compelling.” Actually, I am almost speechless at what is here.

When “The Call” came in 2009 to undertake this task, The Scribe was worried that people would think he was delusional or worse. Turns out it was pretty much the only thing he was right about!

If you dislike yourself and want to learn more about the New New Testament or the Scribe himself, check out the website. WARNING: clicking on this link actually leads to website with further information and sections of new ‘revealed’ translations. Also, The Scribe talks about about himself and his translation. Could be very dangerous to brain cells.

HT: Indiana Cargill and the Raiders of the Crystal Hawkeye

2 Comments leave one →
  1. Robert permalink
    September 13, 2011 11:12 am

    PLEROW clearly means ‘to full up’ or ‘to fulfil’. I’m not sure who’s suggesting that it should have been ‘abolish’, but Matthew’s Jesus consistently wants the Law to be kept (he’s writing for Jews), and when it comes to interpreting the Law, he always agrees with the Pharisees. It’s speculation, and I don’t think there’s any substance to it, as it would go against the whole tenor of Matthew’s Gospel.

  2. September 13, 2011 11:25 am

    Robert,

    “The Scribe” was on a three-month Vision Quest in the desert when Jesus ‘asked’ him to rewrite the NT. I think that pretty much sums it up whether it is speculation or not!

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