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A Biblical Studies Kobayashi Maru?

September 28, 2011

Yesterday I mentioned the Kobayashi Maru, a no-win scenario and a Starfleet training exercise designed to test the character of cadets in the command track at Starfleet Academy.

I’m wondering if there is a similar test that can be constructed for biblical/historical studies? I’m suggesting attempting a harmony of Joshua/Judges that comports with historical and archaeological knowledge, and in which both narratives must be made consistent with the other.

Can it be done? Is it possible? Or will there always be some part of either narrative that will contradict the ‘history’ of the other?

Could this be a biblical studies Kobayashi Maru? Can you think of others? (Kings/Chronicles?)

6 Comments leave one →
  1. 4xi0m permalink
    September 28, 2011 2:56 pm

    Apparently, biblical Kobayashi Marus have an Achilles’ heel: the word ‘antinomy.’ Historically, use of that word means you win, because it makes the word ‘contradiction’ go away. Are we allowed to use it, or is rhetorical kryptonite off-limits?

    • September 28, 2011 3:46 pm

      I think rhetoric should be left out… conquest? Peaceable integration (how does Ezra, Nehemiah, Genesis, feel about that?!?) Both? How does that ‘harmonize’ with the biblical account?

      • 4xi0m permalink
        October 2, 2011 9:04 am

        Huh. Well, I’m no biblical studies expert, but it seems to me that it’s hard to find even a biblical genealogy that’s not a Kobayashi Maru.

        • October 2, 2011 9:23 am

          Good point… though the function of genealogies does ‘correct’ some of the problems, it is hard to get over some of the literal or historical difficulties in Genesis or to harmonize the information in Matthew and Luke.

  2. September 29, 2011 2:52 pm

    How about:

    Gospel accounts of Roman occupation of Jerusalem vs historically accurate Roman occupation of Jerusalem.

  3. October 5, 2011 7:25 pm

    Mark/John?

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